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Prof. Oscar Hunt and Prof. King Burke


This advertisement features various articles and letters that attest to the Hunt's and Prof. King Burke's aeronautic feats, specifically in ballon ascensions. Click on the MEDIA ITEMS below for more information

   



THE WORLDWS GREATEST AERONAUTS

(Illustration of Prof. Oscar Hunt)
PROF. HUNT IS THE MAN WHO HAS NEVER MADE A FAILURE IN HIS LIFE. 20 YEARS IN THE BALLOON BUSINESS. MADE MORE ASCENSIONS THAN ANY MAN LIVING.

(Illustration of Mrs. Lottie Hunt)
MISS LOTTIE HUNT IS THE ONLY LADY IN THE WORLD WHO DOES A REGULAR TRAPEZE PERFORMANCE WHILE IN MID-AIR.

(Illustration of Prof. King Burke)
ASS'T. MANAGER.

A few of the many Notices from the Press and letters concerning Prof. Oscar Hunt's Balloon Ascensions and Parachute Descents.

From the Daily Republican, Omaha, Neb.
[Sunday, Sept.13, 1885]

PROF. HUNT, THE HERO OF YESTERDAY'S SENSATION RELATES HIS THRILLING ADVENTURES. HOW HE ESCAPED DROWNING YESTERDAY-OUT IN MUDDY CRESCENT LAKE.

When Professor Hunt had rearranged his disordered toilet yesterday, after he had returned from his thrilling and mid-air trip and involuntary bath in "Cut off" or Crescent Lake, a reporter of the Republican asked him to relate his side of the story. He gave the following narrative:

"The Fair mangers made arrangements with me on Thursday to remain over and give the third exhibition, and it was school children's day, and as the little ones were always my favorites, I allowed them inside the enclosure to see the process of inflation. They were around me as thick as so many little bees, and as the ascension was made for their especial benefit, I wanted to give them great satisfaction. I started and had the balloon all ready to fill at 1 o'clock sharp. In fifteen minutes after I began the inflation she was full, and was standing 90 feet high on the ground and 165 feet in circumference. She was filled better than she had ever been on any trip she has made. I called to the children to keep quiet for just a minute, and they all settled down from their lively chatter so that you could almost hear a pin drop. The monstrous air ship was now tugging and pulling to get loose. I gave teh signal for everybody to let go and csat off ropes. She shot up in the air like a ball from a cannon. She went straight up for a little over a mile; I should say 6,000 or 7,000 feet. The little ones were spellbound, as well as the other people on the ground. As she struck the fourth current of air she began drifting swiftly eastward toward the river until she came over Crescent Lake. As the currents fo wind stopped or changed their courses she began to descent straight downward. The moment that she started down I knew I was in for a ducking. She struck the lake with terrific velocity, and as she did so I doubled myself up on the car, not knowing the depth of the water or the character of the bottom. Luckily the water was deep, and when I hit the water the spray flew up almost as high as the balloon. I went about 27 feet below the surface, as the water-mark on the balloon showed. The minute I came up again the balloon and righted over on her side. I went hand over and hand up the trapeze rope until I got into the rigging, and climbed up on her "neck" to keep the small end under the water to keep the gas in. As there was an easy west wind blowing she broke down under the bulge and blew the balloon ashore. When I got there I crawled out through the mud and water and had pulled her hood up on dry ground, when a boat with one man in it came. I sent him back to the opposite side to get all the boats and men he could as the balloon weighed tons, being thoroughly soaked with water and mud. He came back with four boats loaded with willing hands, and all zealously assisted in pulling her out on shore. Taking off the ropes and everything else that was movable, we loaded her into thelargest boat. When we loaded her the boat suck down into the mud, and it took all the hands to get the boat launched into the deep water. Then we towed her to the west shore, and loading her in wagon took her back to the fair grounds."
"Have yo ever lit in the water before?"
"I have lit in every stream of any importance in the United States. In Detroit, last summer, I made 21 ascensions from Bell's Island, the great summer resort of Michigan. Out of 21 times I lit on land once. The other twenty I lit on the water."

IN MID-AIR SAILS THE INTREPID AERONAUT.
PROF. OSCAR HUNT, "THE GREATEST LIVING AERONAUTIC WONDER OF THE AGE, IS NOW SAILING AT A DIZZY HEIGHT OVER THE CITY, CONSTANTLY PERFORMING ASTONISHING EVOLUTIONS TO THE DELIGHT OF THE MULTITUDE.

[Fremont (O.) Democratic Messenger, July 3, 1884.]
Never beore in the annals of history has there been secured for special features of the grand Band Tournament and Fourth of July Carnival. Chief among these, and far in advance of all others, was the grand balloon ascension of Prof. Oscar Hunt. Mr. Jackson is to be complimented and is deserving of the thanks of spectators present for having secured the services of the most daring and successful, areonaut that ever dangled in mid-air. Words fail to describe, and the pen to picture, the amazement of the surging and excited throng, as the Professor, while at a dizzy height from terra firma, performed some of the most daring evolutions upon the frail-looking trapeze that man ever witnessed. He is unquestionably the greatest and most successful living aeronaut of the day. Previous deeds of daring, which always succeed as a magnet in drawing and attracting lovers of the truly wonderful, pale into utter insignificance when contrasted with the thrilling and perilous feat of Prof. Hunt. At great expense the management succeeded in securing his services, and he has not only been the chief attraction, "drawing card" as it were, but returned thousand of dollars to the treasury where one was withdrawn for his compensation. The beauty, grandeur and success of his ascension at the fair grounds, Wednesday, spread like wildfire throughout the surrounding country. Dispatches, upon "lighting wings," were sent to all parts of the State, and when Thursday morning arrived every public thoroughfare and every excursion and regular train which entered the city was literally thronged with humanity. The tournament has been the means of placing thousands and thousands of dollars in the treasury, and no feature has added so greatly to the receipts as the exploits of this aeronaut, Prof. Oscar Hunt. He made his first ascent in an aerial monster when but eleven years of age, and his experience in that line has been a continuation of brilliant success. He has twice circumnavigated the globe, giving exhibitions of his wonderful and awe-inspiring feats. Every fair association or public gathering, where a magnetizing attraction is desired, should not fail to institute a correspondence with the Professor. Money invested into other attraction will pay as large a dividend as that expended in securing the services of the King of Aeronauts. Just as we go to press-Thursday afternoon-Prof. Hunt is making his second trip to the clouds. Thirty thousand people are rending the air with cheer after cheer, and all the bands present are enlivening the scene with the soul-stirring strains of a patriotic air. It is now rising gracefully, the outline of the bold aeronautic engineer standing out in bold relief against the background of an azure sky. What is more exciting and novel, more pretty and artistic? This daring air navigator is of national repute. The mere mention of his name in the most remote quarters of the globe arouses such irrepressible enthusiasm as to give marked significance to the fact that he is beyond doubt the most noted and successful aeronaut of the present age.

OFFICE OF THE MAHONOY VALLEY AGRICULTURAL ASSO'N.
ASHLAND, PA., Jan. 22d, 1889.
This is to certify that Prof. Hunt Aeronaut of Cleveland, O., furnished our Association with the grandest attraction of our Fair, in one of his daring Balloon Ascensions and Parachute leaps. The Ascension was made by a lady, who after ascending 5,000 feet, jumped from her Balloon and descended by the aid of a Parachute. When the jump was made, the spectators were spellbound with fear, and had their nerves considerably shattered; but upon landing energetic were delighted at her successful accomplishment of the daring feat. The directors, feeling this to be the strongest attraction of our Fair, are unanimous in securing the services of Prof. Hunt for the coming season, and heartily recommend him to any Fair Association desiring strong drawing special attractions; and a competent, reliable and trustworthy Aeronaut to perform the work.

Respectfully,
Frank Rentz, Sec'y

KANSAS CITY, FORT SCOTT AND GULF R'Y LINE, GENERAL PASSENGER & TICKET DEP'T. KANSAS CITY, July 6, 1885.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
I desire to say for Prof. Oscar Hunt, who, with Mrs. Lottie Hunt, made a balloon race at Merriam Park, on the Fourth of July, 1885, that their ascensions were a perfect success in every way. It was the greatest attraction at the park, and was largely instrumental in attracting the 15,000 people that were at the park on that day. I take pleasure in certifying to the professor's integrity and business ability.

J.E. LOCKWOOK,
G.P.&T. Agent.

ARTIC SPRINGS, LOUISVILLE, KY., June 24th 1889.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The engagement of Prof. Oscar Hunt, of Cleveland, Ohio, for five Balloon Ascensions and Parachute leaps, which were made at Artic Springs, Louisville, Ky., proved to be one of the greatest financial successes ever entered into by me, and gave universal satisfaction to the thousands who witnessed them. Having previously contracted with four other aeronauts who all made failures, the people about here began to feel that an Ascension and Parachute leap could not be mage. I had repeatedly heard of Prof. Hunt in different parts of the country and decided to contract with him for and Ascension and Parachute leap. I cannot describe the gratification and satisfaction expressed by all upon the completion of the Ascension and Parachute descent, in fact, it at once decided me upon a renewal of the contract for four more Ascensions and leaps which were in every way as successful as the first.
I have much pleasure in recommending Prof. Hunt and his Balloon Ascencsions and Parachute leaps to all proprietors of summer resorts, and managers of fair associations who may require special attractions, as one of the strongest drawing attractions that can be secured.

Respectfully,
CHAS. D. BAY.

SANDUSKY, O., July 5th, 1889

PROF. OSCAR HUNT, CLEVELAND, OHIO.

Sir: It is with the greatest degree of satisfaction that the Business Men's Association of Sandusky, O., communicate to you the result of the Balloon Ascension and Parachute leap made yesterday by Prof. King Burke, under our auspices. Prof. Burke is highly complimented for the performance he gave our people, and is certainly worthy not onl only of your confidence but the confidence of any and all desiring a prompt, energetic, and thoroughly reliable Aeronaut. The almost uspeakabable pleasures and satisfaction that was universal throughtout the large audience that witnessed teh Ascension an leap, gives us great pleasure to endorse this verdict with confirmation strong and emphatic

Yours truly,

W.W. WOODAWRD,
Pres't. Bus. Men's Asso.




ID:
acca035

Notes:
Typewritten in red ink with pictures of various balloons and of the Hunts, along with a picture of Prof. King Burke.

Date:
1889

Collection Location:
Allegany County Library

Original Size:
41cm x 35cm

Subject:
Entertainers; History (Md.)

Coverage:
Eastern United States, 1889

 
 
Western Maryland Regional Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

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