Whilbr Heading
Search | Use Google Search
Collection:


Words or Phrase:


Search Method Help Image




Left Nav Image    Home   |   Links   |   Contact Us   |   Facebook   |   Digital Whilbr
Yellow Bar image
Description ImageWhilbr Description
        
 

  


Collection Dropdown Image
Allegany County
Category Divider
Garrett County
Category Divider
Washington County
Category Divider
Civil War in Maryland
Category Divider
Genealogy Resources
Category Divider
Photographs and Prints
 
The Cumberland Coal Fields.


Click on the MEDIA ITEMS below for more information

   



The Cumberland Coal Fields.

THIS now celebrated Coal Field lies west of the city of Cumberland, in a basin formed by the Great Savage Mountain on the North-west and the Dan's Mountain on the South east, and running North-east and South-west from Pennsylvania State Line, through Allegany county, into Mineral county, West Virginia. The basin is about five miles wide between the two ranges and about twenty miles long. The floor of the basin slopes from either end upwards to Frostburg, where it attains its greatest altitude, from 2,000 to 2,100 feet above mean tide.

The Southern slope of the basin is drained by George's Creek, flowing South-west from Frostburg and emptying into the Potomac river. The Northern slope, by Jenning's Run, flowing North west into Will's Creek. The aggregate depth of the coal formation here is 1,100 feet, its base being the Millstone Grit. Capping the summits of Savage and Dan's mountains, it extends down their sides into the valley, where it dips below the surface.

The principal coal veins are, first, the " Big Vein," fourteen feet of coal, lying 1,860 feet above tide. This is the vein from which most of the coal is now mined. It underlies the surface of the valley at Frostburg and Borden Shaft, but southward, down the George's Creek, water has cut away that portion of the measure lying in the lowest part of the valley and with it this vein (which here must have been very near the surface) leaving the higher parts only of the vein standing in the hills thus formed on either side of the water course. Second, the "Four Foot Vein," which lies about 800 feet below the "Fourteen Foot Vein." This vein is below water in the higher part of the basin; but appears about sixty feet above at Barton, and lies above the level from that point south




ID:
acmr008

Page #:
8

Creator:
C.J. Orrick

Date:
1875

Collection Location:
Allegany County Public Library

Original Size:
21 x 14 cms

Contributor:
Board of Trade of the City of Cumberland

Subject:
Mines and mineral resources, Maryland, Cumberland

Coverage:
Cumberland, Md., 1870s

 
 
Western Maryland Regional Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

Footer Image     Contact Webmaster  |  Copyright Information Top Line Image