Whilbr Heading
Search | Use Google Search
Collection:


Words or Phrase:


Search Method Help Image




Left Nav Image    Home   |   Links   |   Contact Us   |   Facebook   |   Digital Whilbr
Yellow Bar image
Description ImageWhilbr Description
        
 

  


Collection Dropdown Image
Allegany County
Category Divider
Garrett County
Category Divider
Washington County
Category Divider
Civil War in Maryland
Category Divider
Genealogy Resources
Category Divider
Photographs and Prints
 
Fort Ashby in the Youghiogheny Glades page 7


Click on the MEDIA ITEMS below for more information

   



western end of the Ashby Cemetery. It consisted of one room with a dirt floor and was constructed of stone and logs with its roof concealed by brush—thus making a camouflage to deceive the Indians.

About four years later the family built a three story hewn-log cabin, which was located approximately one hundred feet south of the present Matthews house, Iret Ashby declared. The ground story had a puncheon floor like that of the second and third stories. This first floor was used mostly as a kitchen, the large fireplace at one end serving for both heat and cooking purposes. The second floor was divided into dining and living rooms, while the third story was arranged for bedrooms. A porch extended from the second floor and faced east.

The builders "rived" their own boards with a froe. The term "froe" is evidently of local usage, although it is defined by some unabridged dictionaries as a "cleaving knife with the blade at right angles to the handle, used for riving staves, shingles, etc." As used at this time, it was a cutting tool similar to a scythe, except that it was shorter and the blade was straight. The top of the blade was somewhat thicker than the lower edge. At the end of the froe a straight handle was attached. A block, three feet long, cut from a tree, was cut into strips, known as clapboards, by placing the froe on the top and with a maul pounded the froe through the block. These early builders also made their own tree nails and wooden pins, which were a common method of fastening timbers.




ID:
gctg027

Creator:
Rev. J. C. Breuninger

Notes:
The writer and Felix G. Robinson at the home of General Kelly on his Swan Meadow Estate. Picture through courtesy Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Lichty. Taken June 10, 1961.

Date:
Summer 1963

Collection Location:
Ruth Enlow Library, Oakland

Original Size:
22 x 15 cms

Contributor:
Editor: Felix G. Robinson

Subject:
Maryland, History

Coverage:
Western Maryland, 1750-1963

 
 
Western Maryland Regional Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

Footer Image     Contact Webmaster  |  Copyright Information Top Line Image