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Memories of Oakland, page 7


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he carried in it. He would take his seat well up front, then take the handkerchief out of his hat and apply it to his nose. Then an awful explosion would reverberate to the rafters, like Gabriel's trumpet. Returning the handkerchief to his hat he was now ready for business.

John Armstrong who always rested his head on the back of his seat in front of McCarty's during the services, George Loar, K. White, William Loar, A. Spiker, E. D. Kepner and Marquis Perry would form part of the congregation at that time. Marquis Perry was afflicted with "St. Anthony's Dance". It was amusing, as well as pathetic, to watch him especially when he joined in singing. He would be singing fine (?) when his mouth would suddenly close and shut the music off. Then the contortions of his face would plainly tell the effort he was making to rejoin, which he would do as suddenly as he had stopped and always in the proper place.

Mr. Sampson who lived south of town would sometimes preach. D. A. Matthews and Dr. Dorsey were also capable of delivering good sermons which they did in the absence of the Pastor. Dr. Dorsey who lived across the street from the church was then the only physician in the town. It was expected of a doctor then to* be capable of furnishing both physical and spiritual aid when required. "Doc" was equal to the occasion. He was an eloquent orator, and when the word was passed around that he was going to preach a good sized congregation was always in attendance. If he came down to the store on Saturday to get a few shoe pegs to make wedges to hold his two artificial teeth in the center of his upper jaw, it was evident! he was going to preach the next day, and was announcement enough—the church would be full.

Turning to the left on Second and Alder Streets, and about half way to Third Street, on the right hand side was "Yankee" Miller's place; of business. Ascending a flight of stairs we entered the room where he kept his stock in trade which consisted of Yankee notions, ginger bread snaps, and "small beer". The beer was his own manufacture and was decidedly "small". A jag on it at five cents a glass would have been quite a luxury. I called in there on July 4th to get fire crackers to celebrate the day. He charged me ten cents a pack which made me go almost broke, as I had paid about their weight in the currency of the times. The currency was the old fashioned copper cent which I had acquired by churning for mother at one cent a churning. As an especial attraction to his place that day was a Band, consisting of two pieces—a snare drum with Mr. Carter as manipulator of the sticks which he did exceedingly well with all the fingers of his left hand off at the second joint. He was assisted by a fiddler whom I did




ID:
gctg196

Creator:
Thomas J. Brandt

Date:
1956

Collection Location:
Ruth Enlow Library, Oakland

Original Size:
22 x 15 cms

Subject:
Maryland, History

Coverage:
Western Maryland, 1750-1963

 
 
Western Maryland Regional Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

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